Via Ferrata Dibona, Cortina, Dolomites, Italy

A traverse of the via ferrata Dibona, Cortina, Dolomites, Italy on Friday 26/08/11.
I travelled alone from the top of the skilift station to Ospitale, taking just 5 hours 20 minutes (solo travel is always faster). I met various people along the way but travelled the last half mainly with Davide & Elisabeth.

Europe’s largest high-alpine meadow — eight miles wide, 20 miles long, and soaring up to 6,500 feet high — is Alpe di Siusi. Most hikers will enjoy the easy meadow strolls, surrounded by quintessential Dolomite mountain views, while the nearby Schlern and Sasso Lungo mountains tempt and reward those with more energy and an adventurous spirit. For more information on the Rick Steves’ Europe TV series — including episode descriptions, scripts, participating stations, travel information on destinations and more — visit http://www.ricksteves.com.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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13 Comments

  1. johnjrp01 says:

    Matyas: I didn’t video the section that didn’t have protection as I was on
    my knees. It is not difficult and the exposure (cliffs below) isn’t any
    more than on other sections, it’s just that I would have liked protection.
    Some people nearby did walk that section so it all depends on your nerve.

  2. Riccardo Monego says:

    Hi, i’m sorry if i don’t talk english well but, i’m not english. I’m
    italian. i want a lot do this ferrata but, i’m frightend. It is difficult
    or it is just long?

  3. johnjrp01 says:

    Hi Riccardo, the Via Ferrata is not very difficult, but it is very long. A
    lot of it is downhill. It is mostly well protected but there is one section
    with no protection which is narrow and is quite scary; I went on my knees
    for this section. I wouldn’t recommend it in cloud or mist as the route is
    not always obvious. Have fun. John

  4. CopernicanPrinciple says:

    The Dolomites is on my to-do list. Thank you for sharing. I will definitely
    be hooking myself to every steel bar or extension I can find being that I
    am acrophobic. Though I imagine after several days being at such heights
    the fear subsides and I would look less like a lunatic on rocks clinging to
    every dear crevice for life.

  5. rbelatamas says:

    What happened with the ruined houses?

  6. johnjrp01 says:

    rbelatamas: Most of this path only exists because it was the front line of
    fighting during the First World War. It was used to bring up men, munitions
    & supplies. All the buildings are old military buildings, not houses. The
    fighting was intense & thousands died up there.

  7. hw ka says:

    Which part was that? Is there a part of a video of that? I’m planning this
    tour in the future and i’m interested in that scary section. Thank you

  8. MD TAREQUE says:

    LIKE IT……

  9. MD TAREQUE says:

    LIKE IT……

  10. mPky1 says:

    Thanx for the vids rick, great stuff

  11. lancerhammer says:

    excellent video

  12. bleue41 says:

    magnifique paysage merci du partage

  13. olhemi1 says:

    awesome photography

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